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Emacs Emacs Lisp

2 Functions in Elisp

Here’s how to define a simple LISP function

1: (defun pi ()
2:   "A sample non-interactive function"
3:   3.1415
4: )

The above is a non-interactive function that simply returns 3.1415. Evaluate it (C-x C-e, remember?) and you will see the word pi appear in the echo area. Try M-x pi, though, and Emacs won’t find the function. If you want to be able to call a function using M-x, you have to make it interactive, as follows.

1: (defun print-pi()
2:     "Insert an approximation to pi"
3:     (interactive)
4:     (insert "3.1415")
5: )

So why would you want a non-interactive function? Perhaps because you want it to be called from another function, as follows:

1: (defun circumference-of-circle()
2:     (interactive)
3:     (message "The circumference of a circle diameter 3 is %f" (* pi 3))
4: )

Before evaluating the above function, make sure that you have evaluated the non-interactive function pi.

There are lots of different types of interactive functions. The next interactive function is more useful in that it prompts for the diameter to be input (the n at the start of “nInput diameter of circle:” is what tells Emacs to prompt for a number)

1: (defun circumference-of-circle(diameter)
2:     "Calculate the circumference of a circle given the diameter"
3:     (interactive "nInput diameter of circle:")
4:     (message "The circumference of a circle diameter %d is %f" diameter (* 3.1415 diameter))
5: )

Here’s the same function but this time set up to receive the parameter from the universal argument. That is to say, in the form C-u 4 M-x circumference-of-circle.

1: (defun circumference-of-circle(diameter)
2: (interactive "p")
3: (message "The circumference of a circle diameter %d is %f" diameter (* 3.1415 diameter))
4: )

Here’s an example of a function that reads strings and tests your knowledge of capital cities.

1: (defun capital-of-france(answer)
2:     "Simple quiz example."
3:     (interactive "sWhat's the Capital of France?")
4:     (if (string= answer "paris") (message "Correct!") (message "Wrong!"))
5: )

Argument codes for interactive functions can be found here http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/elisp/Interactive-Codes.html#Interactive-Codes

Next: Interactive Functions that work on Regions

Categories
Emacs Emacs Lisp

1 Beginning Emacs Lisp

LISP is derived from the term LISt Processing.

A list in LISP looks like this:

(Knife Fork Spoon)

or like these two examples
(set-background-color "yellow")    <- C-x C-e
(set-background-color "white")    <- C-x C-e

If the first item in the list is a function you can evaluate the list by placing the cursor just after the bracket at the end of the list and pressing C-x C-e. Try it with the two lists above. Copy them into Emacs and then C-x C-e where indicated to turn the Emacs background yellow and then to set it white again.

If you try to evaluate the (Knife Fork Spoon) list you’ll get an error telling you that Knife is a void function.

Try evaluating the following lists in Emacs by typing C-x C-e after the closing bracket:
(linum-mode)
(message "This is the echo area")
(* 2 3)
(+ 4 5)

The last three will output their results in the echo area, the area at the bottom of Emacs.

You can also evaluate a function by typing M-x (function name). So M-x visual-line-mode will turn word wrap on and off.

Emacs supports TAB completion, so typing M-x visu and pressing TAB is enough to fill in the function name.

You set a variable as follows:

(set 'name 'John) C-x C-e to set the variable

name C-x C-e to see the contents of the variable “name”

If you press C-x C-e after (name)you’ll get an error. Remember, name is a variable, (name) is a function, and you haven’t defined a function called name.
It’s a nuisance typing in ‘ all the time, so the following is often used
(setq animal 'cat)

Evaluate the above and then evaluate animal …

C-u C-x C-e will insert any output directly in the text area, rather than in the echo area.

Here is a list of cheeses called cheese:
(setq cheese '(Stilton Wensleydale Cheddar Cheshire))

Evaluate the list.

The first item in a list is called the car, the remaining items are called the cdr (pronounced could-er) The Emacs Lisp tutorial will tell you why. Evaluate the following:

(car cheese)
(cdr cheese)

… and there you are

Next: Functions in Elisp